Progressio closes after 76 years

At a meeting on 14 September 2016 to discuss the conclusions of a consultation on Progressio’s future, the charity’s Trustees and Chair of Trustees took the decision to close Progressio in March 2017. The decision was taken on the basis that Progressio was not able to secure sufficient levels of income to ensure a viable future post March 2017. Martin McEnery, Progressio’s Chair of Trustees, said:

Life in Yemen; a country devastated by ongoing conflict

An eye-opening blog by Abeer Al Absi, Yemen Country Representative for Progressio, on the harrowing effects the ongoing conflict is having in Yemen, and the challenges faced by NGO workers there. December, 2016. 

Yemen has been devastated by the ongoing conflict that escalated in March 2015. It is now estimated that 19.3 million people need humanitarian assistance to establish or maintain safe water and sanitation, with 9.8 million people directly affected by the conflict. 

Tackling gender-based violence in Zimbabwe

Fiona Mwashita, Progressio’s Southern Africa Regional Manager, explains how socialisation, a continuing process whereby an individual acquires a personal identity and learns the norms, values, behaviour, and social skills appropriate to his or her social position, worsens the level of violence against women and girls in Zimbabwe. 

The challenges faced when trying to eliminate violence against women in Somaliland

Suad Abdi, Somaliland Country Representative for Progressio, describes the barriers and challenges faced when trying to prevent and eliminate violence against women in Somaliland. 

The latest estimates from the Ministry of Labour and Social Affairs point to a rise in the number of cases of violence against women in Somaliland, especially in the form of rape.

How harmful social norms and poverty exacerbate the issue of violence against women in Malawi

Thomas Msiska, Malawi Country Representative for Progressio, explains how harmful social norms and poverty exacerbate the issue of violence against women in Malawi. 

Thank you from all of us at Progressio

We are very grateful and humbled by the many messages of support and appreciation from our supporters in the UK and overseas, partner organisations, former staff members, development workers and ICS alumni during this sad time for Progressio, and all of Progressio’s current and former staff, volunteers and the people we work alongside. 

International development charity Progressio to close

International development charity Progressio has announced it is to close next year, following a period of consultation with its staff, partners, supporters and funders.
 
The decision was made by the organisation’s trustees on the basis that it will not be possible to secure sufficient levels of income to ensure a viable future post March 2017. Staff, partners, funders, volunteers and other stakeholders have been informed.
 

Progressio closes after 76 years

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At a meeting on 14 September 2016 to discuss the conclusions of a consultation on Progressio’s future, the charity’s Trustees and Chair of Trustees took the decision to close Progressio in March 2017. The decision was taken on the basis that Progressio was not able to secure sufficient levels of income to ensure a viable future post March 2017. Martin McEnery, Progressio’s Chair of Trustees, said:

From abuse and imprisonment, to standing up for women's rights. Read Om Khalid's story.

Om Khalid, now 25 years old, was accused of adultery after being sexually abused by a man in her village. As an orphan in Yemen, with no family to support her, she was jailed while the perpetrator was set free. She was then sexually abused several times by three policemen during the interrogation. After being assisted by ‘The Protection of the Rights of Female Inmates and Juvenile Offenders’ project, who provided her with legal support, she was released.

Progressio's work in Yemen, a country devastated by the war

In this blog, Abeer Al Absi, Yemen Country Representative for Progressio, talks about the devastating effects the conflict has had in Yemen, especially for women and girls. Abeer also explains the importance of Progressio's current work in Yemen, working alongside local partners to support marginalised women and girls to empower themselves.   

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