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For the Love of... Bishops?

Progressio has been watching the Lima Conference with a keen eye and excited anticipation. This conference marks the very last chance for delegates from all over the world to gather together and put some solid commitments on the table before any final deal is agreed at Paris next year. Right now any such deal hangs in the balance. That is why this event has been so important.

Commitments need to be made and they need to be bold. 

Malawi: Team Sapitwa and fire on the mountain

Mulanje Mountain is a monadnock (an isolated rock) in Southern Malawi, rising sharply from the surrounding plains of Chiradzulu, and the tea growing Mulanje district. It measures approximately 572km 2 22x26 Kilometers (13x16 208 sq miles) and has a maximum elevation of 3,002 m at its highest point Sapitwa Peak. 

The elevation of the mountain is great enough for it to disturb upper level air flow and form its own microclimate making it an important source of water for almost every river that runs through this part of Malawi.

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#EU2030: the climate deal that doesn’t go far enough, fast enough

The EU has agreed a much-needed climate deal which lays down the Union’s commitments on climate and energy from now until 2030. This is a demonstration of its ability to agree on targets in a time of continued economic austerity and in the face of ongoing global challenges.

Many had feared that the leaders of the EU’s Member States would be unable to reach consensus and move forward with a binding outcome, so the fact a deal has been reached is encouraging.

Here is a breakdown of what has actually been agreed:

 

Climate change finally back on the agenda - you can act today

The UN Climate Summit, held at UN headquarters in New York on 23rd September 2014 was famously attended by Leando Di Caprio. We wanted to keep you updated as the momentum on the climate change campaign builds up!

The Climate Summit, called by UN Secretary General Ban Ki Moon, aimed to mobilize action ahead of 2015 and to increase political will for greater action and ambition on climate change.

People’s Climate March sees 40,000 people stand up for climate justice

To join together against climate change, I walked with thousands of people in the capital for the People’s Climate March. 40,000 people turned up to demand that our leaders take action on climate change and push for an outcome where the poorest people in the world are protected from and equipped to deal with it.

El Salvador: And so it begins...

After a week of orientation we said farewell to the energetic city of San Salvador for the unknown environment of Nuevo Gualcho. The different ways of life we were eager to encounter were almost portrayed to us during our journey, various road-side stalls selling fruit showed us the reality of the struggle to generate an income. Stepping onto Gualcho ground, the sense of wanting to make a real difference was amongst us all.

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Malawi: Volunteers reviving seedlings in Dunduzu Primary School

Working the field

Tuesday was glorious.

There was a sense of release and catharsis among the team today as the group, finally, were able to swap the tedium and frustration of planning for blisters and sunburn working out in the field.

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"Together with the environment"

“Together with the environment…. In Cuzco, we are adapting to climate change.”

That's the slogan of a new campaign encouraging people in Cuzco, Peru, to adapt to climate change. Thanks to the support of Progressio development worker Alberto Vasquez, the Cuzco region is now equipped with a Communications Strategy for Adapting to Climate Change. Here, Alberto writes about what he hopes will be achieved once the strategy is put into practice:

Getting emotional about climate change: a response to the IPCC report

Progressio's Esther Trewinnard writes:

A few years ago, I took a friend of mine who was visiting the UK from Tanzania to a talk given by a leading scientist on the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). On the train back home she turned to me and said, “You will be OK, but we in Africa are going to die.” My response was pathetic and helpless, but the best I could come up with was: “Don’t be silly, we’re in this together.” 

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